17 February 2017
Two months ago, the Health Foundation published a thought paper written by Martin Bardsley. The first paragraph of the report sets out the problem it was addressing.
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15 February 2017
Flow_ology is a method that gets data about patient flow into the bloodstream of a general hospital. I teach this method in a workshop that has three acts.
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10 February 2017
Imagine you've been given the job of preparing a great big three-course Sunday lunch for the full extended family. Three complicated dishes you've never cooked before. But all you've got in front of you is an incomplete, fragmented list of ingredients. No step-by-step instructions. And even the list of ingredients has got vital things missing from it.
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3 February 2017
There's a narrative arc to the Flow_ology course which mirrors the argument underpinning the theory I call "The Fullness Hypothesis".
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24 January 2017
What's the use of data without pictures or conversations? Anaximaps is a new one-day workshop that shows data analysts how to acquire, analyse and populate user-drawn maps of health and social care processes.
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23 January 2017
This is a thought-provoking piece by William Davis, published in the Guardian on 19 January 2017. Although its sweep is broad, much of what this article says is highly relevant to healthcare statistics. One of my favourite sentences from it is: "Official knowledge becomes ever more abstracted from lived experience, until that knowledge simply ceases to be relevant or credible."
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20 January 2017
One of the questions that keeps me awake at night is this: "When you've got a problem, and you don't know what the solution to that problem is—but you do know that information will help in the understanding and solving of the problem—how do you decide what information to look at?"
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13 January 2017
We need to start looking at health and social care activity from an "individual patient journey" perspective. This means being a lot less interested in knowing—separately and in isolation—how many A&E attendances in total, how many district nurse contacts in total, how many homecare visits in total, how many GP consultations in total. And—instead—being a lot more interested in how individual patients become an embodiment of collections of events.
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10 January 2017
There are three open course dates in London coming up over the next two months. Demystifying Statistics is a whistle-stop tour through the basic stats syllabus. Arguing with Numbers shows how to describe numbers using the written word and the spoken word - ranging from the one-side-of-A4 summary to the longer, more complex, data-rich report. Flow_ology teaches a 'method' for analysing and presenting unscheduled care data on patient flow within acute hospital organisations.
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6 January 2017
I considered at great length the question of field. In classical anthropology, there's a rigid distinction between "field" and "home". Field's where you go to do your research, immersing yourself, sometimes at great personal risk, in a maelstrom of raw, unsorted happening. Home's where you go to sort and tame it: catalogue it, analyse it, transform it into something meaningful.
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